MeisterSinger Lunascope

The MeisterSinger Lunascope, moon-phase display

Although the movement of the long, single hour hand is hardly noticeable to the human eye, it is as relentless as the passing of time on ancient sundials. Our division and representation of time has always followed the movement of the stars. Even back in the Middle Ages, tower clocks emulated astronomical models, preferring to recreate the mechanics of the heavens on Earth rather than wanting to show single minutes or even seconds. With its single-hand watches, MeisterSinger follows the tradition of these early timepieces. Now, the renowned watch designer is presenting its first astronomical watch – the Lunascope.

Correction after 128 years

The slender stainless steel case of the Pangaea family forms the ideal backdrop for an unusually large moon-phase display. The upper half of the dial features a dynamic cut in which the moon moves across a dark blue, starry background. The generous diameter of this timepiece allows a realistic depiction of even fine details of the moon’s surface – like looking up at the sky on a clear night. The natural impression of the Earth’s satellite corresponds to the astronomical precision with which the Lunascope represents the moon’s various phases. The moon takes 29 days, 12 hours, 44 minutes, and 2.9 seconds to circumnavigate the Earth. Most watches round this figure down to 29.5 days via the movement, which means they deviate by eight hours per year and need to be corrected by one complete day every three years. However, the movement specially designed for the MeisterSinger Lunascope is far more exact. Its moon-phase indicator only needs a slight adjustment after 128 years – a short period in astronomical terms, but a very long time in the world of watchmaking.

  • MeisterSinger Lunascope LS908

    MeisterSinger Lunascope LS908

    €2,900.00
    Incl. 19% VAT, Excl. shipping Watch now & buy

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